Contact Us

Senior Program Manager, Division of Education
Zusel Matos, MHSA
Phone: 305-585-1280
Email: zmatos@miami.edu

Application Information

Eligibility:
All of our positions are filled through the National Resident Matching Program. We do not offer out-of-match positions. Candidates must meet requirements of Jackson Memorial Hospital, ACGME, American Board of Plastic Surgery and the division in order to start and maintain training in the program.

All pre-requisite training must be taken within programs accredited by the ACGME, Royal College of Surgeons (Canada) or the American Dental Association. Proof of having completed this prerequisite training must be submitted and approved by the ABPS. This approval must be submitted in writing to the program director prior to the commencement of matriculation into the plastic surgery residency program. This will become part of the resident’s permanent file. This necessary paperwork must be accomplished prior to the actual matriculation into the plastic surgery residency program or admission to the ABPS examination.

How to Apply:
Applications are accepted via the Electronic Residency Application Service.

Deadline:
Please refer to ERAS dates/timelines for application open dates. Interviews are conducted from December to January.

Call Schedule

All residents, regardless of program year, are responsible for taking call. During the first year, the resident should be on-call no more than every third night. Call schedule will include each junior resident rotating every third night. On maxillofacial trauma admitting nights, all call will be from home. All residents, especially the plastic surgery residents, are expected to provide efficient and prompt response to the needs of the emergency room and trauma center for the management of all facial injuries and all other related plastic surgery admissions. If there is excessive need for the junior resident, the chief resident on-call will serve as backup. In addition, a plastic surgery resident is always on call for any consultation requiring specific plastic surgery expertise. Chief residents at Jackson Memorial Hospitaland the Miami VA Medical Center will alternate call from home and provide satisfactory backup to the juniors. Attending backup is always available by phone or beeper. When necessary, an attending will come to the hospital.

Locations

Jackson Memorial Hospital

1611 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

1201 N.W. 16th Street

Miami, FL 33125

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Nicklaus Children’s Hospital

3100 S.W. 62nd Avenue

Miami, FL 33155

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UHealth Tower

1400 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Program Requirements

Medical Licensing Examination:
All applicants must successfully complete United States Medical Licensing Examination Steps 1, 2 and 3 or all steps of the Comprehensive Medical Licensing Examination prior to the start of the program.

Postgraduate Training:
There is postgraduate training required in the form of an MD or DO degree from an institution accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education or the American Osteopathic Association.

All prerequisite training must be completed within programs accredited by the ACGME, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada or American Dental Association.

Visas

The J1-Visa: Alien Physician Program, sponsored by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, is the standard visa for residents/fellows who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

For specific program eligibility/qualifications or additional information, please contact:

Lourdes Boet
Hospital Services Supervisor
Physician Services Department

Jackson Health System
1611 N.W. 12th Ave. Suite ET-1004
Miami, FL 33136-1096
Phone: 305-355-1122
Fax: 305-355-1123
Email: LBoet@jhsmiami.org

Plastic Surgery – Integrated Residency

Mission & Vision

Our mission is to enable residents to acquire satisfactory clinical skills and a sound, basic fund of didactic knowledge in preparation for the independent practice of their chosen plastic surgery specialty. This is primarily achieved through the progressive process of increasing resident responsibilities and continued self-evaluation based on faculty assessment of residents’ educational progress and clinical experience, as well as their overall ability and judgment. Every individual within our division is tasked with creating a collegial working environment, while treating every patient with dignity and respect.

Mission & Vision

Our mission is to enable residents to acquire satisfactory clinical skills and a sound, basic fund of didactic knowledge in preparation for the independent practice of their chosen plastic surgery specialty. This is primarily achieved through the progressive process of increasing resident responsibilities and continued self-evaluation based on faculty assessment of residents’ educational progress and clinical experience, as well as their overall ability and judgment. Every individual within our division is tasked with creating a collegial working environment, while treating every patient with dignity and respect.

Program Director’s Welcome

The goal of our resident training program is to guarantee the thorough training of each plastic surgery resident, ensuring each trainee has developed an ethically, professionally and educationally sound foundation for their future practice.

Program Director’s Welcome

The goal of our resident training program is to guarantee the thorough training of each plastic surgery resident, ensuring each trainee has developed an ethically, professionally and educationally sound foundation for their future practice.

We have developed a superb, full-time faculty with expertise in abdominal and chest wall reconstruction, cleft/lip palate, craniofacial, hand surgery, pediatric plastic surgery, reconstructive breast surgery, reconstructive microvascular surgery, transgender surgery, vascular anomalies, in addition to general plastic and reconstructive surgery, as well as all aspects of cosmetic surgery. An added plus is the excellent working relationships we have with our colleagues in dermatology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedics, otolaryngology and surgical oncology. These associates provide excellent clinical expertise and serve as excellent educational resources. This enables us to share in an additional pool of patients and provides our division with a truly unique clinical perspective. We are also fortunate to have an outstanding voluntary faculty, many of whom are well-known contributors to the field of plastic surgery.

Our entire faculty remains committed to providing an optimal educational environment to our residents and providing continued excellence in patient-centric care. It is all of these factors, and then some, that have allowed us to develop an excellent, well-rounded teaching program utilizing all of the resources available both within our institution and our surrounding community.

-Zubin J. Panthaki, MD

Description

Our entire faculty remains committed to providing an optimal educational environment to our residents and providing continued excellence in patient-centric care. It is all of these factors, and then some, that have allowed us to develop an excellent, well-rounded teaching program utilizing all of the resources available both within our institution and our surrounding community.

-Zubin J. Panthaki, MD

Fast Facts

Accreditation

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

Number of Residents per Year?

2

Duration of Residency?

6 years

Program Highlights

1-month rotation at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital

Resident cosmetic clinic (acting primary surgeon role) & cosmetic mini-fellowship

Quarterly mission opportunity with Project Medishare for Haiti

Program Curriculum

Year 1 (Internship)

Year one, or PGY-1, has typically been formatted as an internship year with rotations in burns, general, oncology and plastic surgery; surgical intensive care unit; surgical skills lab and trauma. The year is meant to emphasize general surgical core specialties and management of the surgical patient. Interns carry a heavy clinical burden and basic surgical skills are expected to be acquired during the year.

Year 2

Year two, or PGY-2, builds on the experiences of the internship year, increasing exposure to general and vascular surgery and additional ICU rotations. There is also a month of pediatric surgery with emphasis on pediatric plastic surgery. During the year, the resident is expected to have graduated responsibility and increasing autonomy in managing the sick surgical patient.

Year 3

Year three, or PGY-3, is the transitional year with greater emphasis in plastic surgery. The resident is expected to take on a more senior role with administrative responsibilities at the Jackson South Medical Center for six months out of the year. At Jackson South, the resident will spend time in general and vascular surgery, as well as oral and maxillofacial surgery. Significant surgical skills will be acquired in vascular surgery and microsurgical techniques. The final three months of the year are spent on plastic surgery rotations at the Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The resident is expected to start excelling at the plastic surgery in-service exam in the third year.

Year 4

Year four, or PGY-4, has a heavy emphasis on plastic surgery both at Jackson Memorial Hospital, our Level I trauma center for Miami-Dade County and at UHealth Tower, which is the private hospital of the University of Miami. Trainees are exposed to a wide variety of plastic surgical experiences in both traumatic and elective settings. The vast majority of the year is spent in reconstruction rather than cosmetic surgery. There is also a one-to-two month block dedicated to hand surgery on the orthopaedic hand service, and a one month block at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital for exposure to pediatric plastic surgery.

Year 5

Year five, or PGY-5, is divided into equal amounts of rotations at each of our three main hospital sites: Jackson Memorial Hospital, UHealth Tower and the Miami VA Medical Center. The resident is provided graduated responsibility compared to the previous year and is also exposed to more complex reconstructive surgery including dozens of microsurgical three flaps as the primary surgeon. A two-month rotation on hand surgery, both on the orthopaedic and the plastic services further strengthens the hand surgical experience. One month is also provided at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital for pediatric plastic surgery.

Year 6

Year six, or PGY-6, is the final year of the plastic surgery residency and when residents will serve as administrative chiefs for equal periods. Under faculty guidance, they supervise the clinic at Jackson Memorial Hospital where they evaluate candidates for surgical procedures and schedule them for surgery, including cosmetic surgery. This serves as an invaluable bridge to eventual independent practice upon graduation. The year also provides experiences in anesthesia; dermatology; ear, nose and throat; oculoplastics and cosmetic, oral maxillofacial and pediatric surgery.

Your Faculty

Anne-Sophie Lessard, MD
Assistant Professor

John C. Oeltjen, MD, PhD
Associate Professor

Zubin J. Panthaki, MD
Director, Plastic Surgery – Integrated Residency; Hand Surgery (Plastic Surgery) Fellowship; Plastic Surgery – Independent Fellowship and Microsurgery Fellowship programs
Professor

Wrood Kassira, MD
Associate Professor