Contact Us

Program Coordinators, Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program
Director of Education Carmen J. Fuente, J.D., C-TAGME
Program Manager Viveka M. Spivey, MS, C-TAGME
Phone: 305-243-3315
Email: orthoapp@med.miami.edu

Application Information

Eligibility:
All of our positions are filled through the National Resident Matching Program. We do not offer out-of-match positions.

How to Apply:
Applications are accepted via the Electronic Residency Application Service.

Deadline:
Applications are accepted from the ERAS open date until October 1. Interviews are conducted November 16, December 7 and January 11.

Call Schedule

The on-call schedules are the responsibility of the residents.

The PGY-2 orthopaedic residents are responsible for in-house coverage of the ER. The PGY-2 at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital only takes call at that institution while the remaining six PGY-2s take call at Jackson Memorial Hospital.

In-house call is covered by the PGY-3 on the night float rotation. This resident is responsible for coverage in-house Sunday through Thursday. Fridays and Saturdays are covered by the remaining PGY-3s and PGY-4s.

Chief call from home is shared among four of the seven PGY-5s. In addition, there are separate call schedules for the hand service (divided equally among the five residents/fellows on the service), UHealth Tower and the Bruce W. Carter Department of VA Medical Center. Call from each of these services/hospital is from home and not in-house.

There is a separate call schedule for Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. The two junior residents at NCH share in-house call with the orthopaedic physician assistants.

Locations

Jackson Memorial Hospital

1611 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Bascom Palmer Eye Institute

900 N.W. 17th Street

Miami, FL 33136

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Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

1201 N.W. 16th Street

Miami, FL 33125

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Holtz Children’s Hospital

1611 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Nicklaus Children’s Hospital

3100 S.W. 62nd Avenue

Miami, FL 33155

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Ryder Trauma Center

1800 N.W. 10th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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UHealth Tower

1400 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Program Requirements

Medical Licensing Examination:
All residency applicants must successfully complete United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 by October 1. Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills should be completed by the time the rank list is due.

Postgraduate Training:
There is no postgraduate training required.

Visas

The J1-Visa: Alien Physician Program, sponsored by the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, is the standard visa for residents/fellows who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

For specific program eligibility/qualifications or additional information, please contact:

Lourdes Boet
Hospital Services Supervisor
Physician Services Department

Jackson Health System
1611 N.W. 12th Ave. Suite ET-1004
Miami, FL 33136-1096
Phone: 305-355-1122
Fax: 305-355-1123
Email: LBoet@jhsmiami.org

Orthopaedic Surgery Residency

Mission & Vision

The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery strives to promote a committed learning environment through our recruitment of faculty whom are current or emerging experts in their respected fields. Additionally, we hope to foster a culture of superior camaraderie, a program where residents can have extraordinary learning opportunities, leadership roles and can still have a fun and enjoyable working environment.

With all great programs, continually improving is crucial to remaining an elite organization. Continuous review and revision of the various aspects of the program are made in an attempt to provide highly motivated residents with the best possible opportunities for reaching their maximal potential. Upon completion of training, each resident will have obtained the expected level of confidence, skill and professional attitude necessary for an orthopaedic surgeon.

Mission & Vision

The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery strives to promote a committed learning environment through our recruitment of faculty whom are current or emerging experts in their respected fields. Additionally, we hope to foster a culture of superior camaraderie, a program where residents can have extraordinary learning opportunities, leadership roles and can still have a fun and enjoyable working environment.

With all great programs, continually improving is crucial to remaining an elite organization. Continuous review and revision of the various aspects of the program are made in an attempt to provide highly motivated residents with the best possible opportunities for reaching their maximal potential. Upon completion of training, each resident will have obtained the expected level of confidence, skill and professional attitude necessary for an orthopaedic surgeon.

Program Director’s Welcome

Program Director’s Welcome

The University of Miami/Jackson Health System residency program in Orthopaedic Surgery is fully approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery as a comprehensive, five-year program. The orthopaedic program is approved for 35 residents equally divided among the five years, combining one year of a rotating internship and four years of orthopaedic surgery. Program curriculum includes adult reconstruction; adult trauma; foot and ankle; hand surgery; musculoskeletal oncology; pediatric orthopaedics; spine and sports medicine.

Ample opportunity is provided for clinical and laboratory research during the five years of residency education. Residents are expected to complete two projects, either in clinical or basic research, during their residency training, and are encouraged to submit their research for presentation and publication.

The organization of the residency training program is designed to expose the resident to a wide variety of orthopaedic problems. The program is well balanced between clinical and surgical activity and didactic teaching experiences. Rotations are structured at intervals conducive to learning and to the development of the resident, with a large base of full-time faculty involved in, and devoted to, resident education and experience.

-Sheila Ann Conway, MD

Description

Ample opportunity is provided for clinical and laboratory research during the five years of residency education. Residents are expected to complete two projects, either in clinical or basic research, during their residency training, and are encouraged to submit their research for presentation and publication.

The organization of the residency training program is designed to expose the resident to a wide variety of orthopaedic problems. The program is well balanced between clinical and surgical activity and didactic teaching experiences. Rotations are structured at intervals conducive to learning and to the development of the resident, with a large base of full-time faculty involved in, and devoted to, resident education and experience.

-Sheila Ann Conway, MD

Fast Facts

Accreditation

Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

Number of Residents per Year?

7

Duration of Residency?

5 years

Program Highlights

97.14% board pass rate (averaged over 5 years)

1 of the most diverse programs in the nation

Affiliated with a leading university medical school & county teaching hospital with a Level I trauma designation

Program Curriculum

Year 1 (Internship)

The first year follows the ACGME program requirements and is designed to expose the orthopaedic intern to a variety of surgical disciplines with four months of general surgery rotations and six months of rotations directly relevant to orthopaedic surgery. The emphasis is on providing excellent hospital care, developing basic surgical skills and developing a foundation in orthopaedics.

Each intern will rotate through the following specialties:

General Surgery:
Trauma (1 month)
Pediatric Surgery (1 month)
Burns (1 month)
Vascular surgery (1 month)

Other Rotations:
Orthopaedic Trauma (2 months)
Orthopaedic Emergency Room (2 months)
Musculoskeletal Oncology (1 month)
Orthopaedic Veterans Affairs (1 month)
Neurosurgery-Spine (1 month)
Musculoskeletal Radiology (1 month)
Vacation (1 month)

The orthopaedic ER rotation is one of the most unique aspects of our program. During this rotation, the intern is paired with a senior orthopaedic resident. Together, they see all emergency room and trauma consults from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. This ensures excellent early exposure to all common orthopaedic trauma. The intern quickly becomes confident assessing orthopaedic injuries in a wide variety of patients.

Interns also participate in a surgical skills laboratory. The lab follows the guidelines of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Additionally, interns attend the Annual Basics of Orthopaedics Course that is held over four weekends in August/September. This extensive course combines lectures and sawbones labs.

Year 2

Residents will spend time rotating in adult reconstruction; hand; pediatrics; spine; sports medicine and trauma, in addition to having one block of research time.

Year 3

Residents will spend time rotating in foot and ankle; hand; musculoskeletal oncology; trauma and veterans affairs.

Year 4

Residents will spend time rotating in foot and ankle; pediatrics; spine; sports medicine and trauma, in addition to having one block of research time.

Also, PGY-4 residents have the opportunity to attend The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, with full support from the department.

Year 5

Residents will spend time rotating in adult reconstruction; hand; musculoskeletal oncology; pediatrics; sports medicine; trauma and veterans affairs.

Other Experience

  • Board review course of choice for all chief residents, sponsored by the department;
  • Summer, two-month anatomy course, held on the medical campus;
  • Synthes AO basic fracture course;
  • Yearly orthopaedic oncology course in the Florida Keys;
  • National meeting sponsorship by the department for accepted papers for presentation; and
  • Quarterly Miami Orthopaedic Society meetings.

Adult Reconstruction

Residents will be exposed to a wide range of cases from primary arthroplasty to complex revisions with a moderate to high volume. A typical week consists of OR days, clinic, academic day with journal club and pre- and post-op conference. Additional exposure to joints is provided during the veterans affairs rotation.

Foot and Ankle

PGY-3 spends one day per week in the OR and one, half day per week in diabetic foot clinic. The rest of the time is spent in private clinics at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and in the OR at The Lennar Foundation Medical Center.
PGY-4 residents rotate in private practice, spending half the week in the OR and half in the office. Cases vary from bread-and-butter foot and ankle, to very complex lower extremity trauma and reconstruction. There is a weekly journal club and/or topic presentation.

Hand

Every morning begins with trauma/pre-op/post-op conference and rounds. The previous day’s ER hand cases are reviewed during this conference. Hand clinic is held at various locations, including Jackson Memorial Hospital, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The remainder of the week is spent in the OR.

Musculoskeletal Oncology

Approximately half of the time is spent in the private attending clinics and half in the OR. This rotation is an excellent opportunity to see the entire spectrum of orthopaedic oncology. Didactics are excellent on this rotation, with weekly faculty presentations. Pre- and post-op conference and multidisciplinary sarcoma conferences take place in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and radiation oncologists. The tumor fellow contributes considerably to resident education in both the OR and in the clinics. Residents spend approximately three days per week in the OR and the remaining time in clinic and attending offices.

Pediatrics

As a PGY-2, the majority of the time is spent at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. Residents receive a good combination of OR and clinic during this rotation.

The PGY-4 is at Holtz Children’s Hospital every day. Two and a half days per week are spent in clinic, and one to two days per week in the OR.

The PGY-5 is exclusively at NCH except for conference on Thursdays. The PGY-5 is in the OR four days per week and clinic one day a week.

Thursdays are academic days with didactic lectures following Thursday morning grand rounds and conferences. Friday mornings before clinic faculty walks the residents through various pediatric cases, from initial evaluation through treatment and follow-up.

Spine PGY-2, 4

There is a good balance of time spent in the OR, clinic and on the floor. The rotation offers excellent exposure to a wide variety of bread-and-butter and complex cases including degenerative disease, spinal deformity, infection, tumor and spinal trauma.

Academics are emphasized with weekly spine conference that includes resident and medical student presentations and spine journal clubs. Spine faculty, residents and fellow meet weekly to discuss cases.

Sports Medicine

The majority of this rotation is spent at The Lennar Foundation Medical Center. Residents will have the opportunity to assist in the care of both collegiate and professional athletes as all faculty are the team physicians for all University of Miami teams and athletic events. Dr. Kaplan is the team physician for the professional baseball team the Florida Marlins. There is opportunity to cover high school sports teams, as well. Approximately half the time is spent in the OR and half in clinics. There is a weekly educational conference.

Trauma

This very busy service (averaging three operating rooms daily) based at Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital and offers an outstanding operative experience for the resident.

The PGY-1 and PGY-2 are responsible for managing the inpatient census and preparing the daily pre-op conference. In addition, there are two midlevel practitioners to assist with inpatient care, thereby affording the PGY-2 significant access to the OR.

The PGY-3 and PGY-4 spend four days per week in the OR and one day in clinic. The chief resident manages the service and is responsible for organizing the daily operative schedule. Residents typically work one-on-one with one of the five trauma attendings.

Residents are exposed to all aspects of orthopaedic trauma, from basic closed fracture care to extremely complex orthopaedic reconstructions. Faculty subspecialty interests are broad and include pelvic reconstruction, limb salvage techniques with Ilizarov/circular ring fixator reconstruction and complex upper extremity reconstruction. There is a tremendous amount of camaraderie in the program in general, but it is especially evident on the trauma service, as everyone lends a hand until the final case is done.

Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

The Bruce W. Carter Department of VA Medical Center provides exposure to general orthopaedics.

The PGY-1 and PGY-3 are in the OR three days a week and in clinic for two days.

The PGY-5 is in the OR five days a week. The most common operations performed include total hip; knee and shoulder replacement; anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and arthroscopic knee and shoulder procedures.

Your Faculty

Amiethab Aiyer, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle

Motasem A. Al Maaieh, MD
Assistant Professor, Musculoskeletal Oncology and Orthopaedic Spine Surgery

Michael Gerald Baraga, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine

Jaime Alberto Carvajal Alba, MD
Assistant Professor, Adult Reconstructive Surgery

David Chen, MD
Assistant Professor, Adult Reconstructive Surgery

Sheila Ann Conway, MD
Director, Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program and Musculoskeletal Oncology Fellowship Program
Professor, Musculoskeletal Oncology

Seth Detchon Dodds, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Hand Surgery

Frank J. Eismont, MD
Chairman and Professor, Orthopaedic Spine Surgery

Natalia Fullerton, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Hand Surgery

Joseph P. Gjolaj, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Spine Surgery

Austin Heare, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Giselle Marie Hernandez, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Victor Hugo Hernandez, MD, MS
Associate Professor, Adult Reconstructive Surgery

Helen Gloria Hui-Chou, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Hand Surgery

Steven P. Kalandiak, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Lee Kaplan, MD
Professor, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine

Nathan H. Lebwohl, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Spine Surgery

Julianne Munoz, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Sports Medicine

Patrick Warren Owens, MD
Professor, Orthopaedic Hand Surgery

Juan Abelardo Augusto Pretell, MD
Associate Professor, Musculoskeletal Oncology

Stephen M. Quinnan, MD
Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Raymond P. Robinson, MD
Professor, Adult Reconstructive Surgery

Fernando E. Vilella-Hernandez, MD
Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Gregory A. Zych, DO
Professor, Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

Alumni Placements Include:

Baylor College of Medicine
Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
Brown University
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Cleveland Clinic Florida
Emory University
Harborview Medical Center
Hospital for Special Surgery
Indiana Hand to Shoulder Center
Lenox Hill Hospital
Massachusetts General Hospital
MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases
Rothman Institute at Jefferson University Hospital
Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Group
San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship
Stanford University
Southern California Orthopedic Institute
The Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute
University of California, San Francisco
University of Pennsylvania
University of Southern California
University of Virginia
Wake Forest University
Washington University in St. Louis

Alumni Placements Include:

Baylor College of Medicine
Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
Brown University
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Cleveland Clinic Florida
Emory University
Harborview Medical Center
Hospital for Special Surgery
Indiana Hand to Shoulder Center
Lenox Hill Hospital
Massachusetts General Hospital
MedStar Union Memorial Hospital
New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases
Rothman Institute at Jefferson University Hospital
Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Group
San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship
Stanford University
Southern California Orthopedic Institute
The Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute
University of California, San Francisco
University of Pennsylvania
University of Southern California
University of Virginia
Wake Forest University
Washington University in St. Louis